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Science

The National Curriculum for Science aims to ensure all pupils:

 

  • Develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific areas of biology, chemistry and physics. 
  • Develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them.
  • Are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

 

Through studying CUSP science, pupils become more expert as they progress through the curriculum, accumulating, connecting and making sense of the rich substantive and disciplinary knowledge.

 

  1. Substantive knowledge - this is the subject knowledge and explicit vocabulary used to learn about the content. 
     
  2. Disciplinary knowledge – this is knowing how to collect, use, interpret, understand and evaluate the evidence from scientific processes. This is taught. It is not assumed that pupils will acquire these skills by luck or hope. Pupils construct understanding by applying substantive knowledge to questioning and planning, observing, performing a range of tests, accurately measuring, comparing through identifying and classifying, using observations and gathering data to help answer questions, explaining and reporting, predicting, concluding, improving, and seeking patterns. We call it ‘Working Scientifically.’ 
     

Scientific analysis is developed through IPROF criteria. We call it ‘Thinking Scientifically.’

 

  • identifying and classifying
  • pattern seeking
  • research
  • observing over time
  • fair and comparative testing


 

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